Induction Loop Video

A few years ago we published a post titled Induction Loop Trick. In the post we wrote about how and why induction loops worked. We thought it would be appropriate to post a video demonstrating the trick in action. We even introduce a few options not mentioned in the original post. Depending on how the gate in installed, this trick may not work in every instance, however it’s good to keep in mind when trying to gain access to a gated building. It’s tricks like this that set the Truck Company apart from the rest!

 

 

 

16 comments

16 Comments so far

  1. Dry Steam March 13th, 2014 10:39 pm

    Sweet Trick!

  2. Mike March 15th, 2014 4:39 pm

    Cool. But at night, it’s going to be hard to see if there is a loop on the ground, where it is, etc. This would be more of a “preplan” trick I suppose. If you commit to trying to trip the loop, you might be wasting valuable time, versus trying other methods of forcible entry that are sure to get us in (saw, etc.)

    For a working fire, I can’t see this being practical unless it is preplanned.

    Maybe more for an internal alarm, odor of gas, etc.

    Thanks!

  3. Brian March 19th, 2014 4:41 pm

    Mike, a flash light works good for finding the loop on the ground during night ops. Great trick

  4. tooltime March 23rd, 2014 8:26 am

    It is our written policy that if a gate or other obstacle such as vehicle is impeding our response with a confirmed fire we have the option and authority to conduct a low speed push with the engine only. Havent got to do it yet but God im hopeful…..

  5. Mike March 30th, 2014 6:25 pm

    I appreciate the sarcasm Brian. My point was, when you have a working fire, I’m gonna be hard pressed to start searching around on the ground, in the dark, yes with my flashlight, looking for a subtle outline in the concrete where the loop was installed. Then go grab my ladder or whatever, and strategically put it under the gate, in JUST the right spot, to trip the loop so we can now go in.

    Again, good trick for situations when TIME is NOT of the essence.

  6. Joe Dirt March 31st, 2014 11:21 pm

    That guy on the bike needs to go to EAP….. he’s obviously D.U.I. That’s some heavy duty swervin’! 🙂

  7. DCFD E16 April 6th, 2014 12:12 pm

    We use a heavy cookie sheet with about 50′ of clothes line tied to it. Just throw it over the loop and drag it back with the rope until it actuates the gate. Then just leave it and drive over it if need be. Unlike the examples in the video, there is no need to keep it or retrieve it until the job is done. No worries about it being driven over either. It is essentially expendable, yet reuseable. Much faster.

  8. sal gangi April 13th, 2014 4:32 pm

    great idea to use, and, of course, it comes down to situational awareness….but always good to know. thanks.

  9. Dillon Stevens April 26th, 2014 3:35 pm

    Pretty ingenious. I would have to use the roof ladder. Neither of my ladders have steel plates.

  10. Robin April 28th, 2014 6:31 pm

    Do you have to leave the metal object on the ground for the duration of the drive through?

  11. Dude June 10th, 2014 12:09 pm

    This is a great trick, especially on heavy gates like we have in our area. Much quicker than firing up a saw, cutting, and moving it out of the way, and if you use something you can leave behind, like the cookie sheet other incoming rigs will thank you. We have found that our metal EMS clipboards work on some of them so our pumpermen can gain access too. Those gates are on a timer once they open and the metal object has passed over it so they do not close on a vehicle trying to leave.

  12. Dude June 10th, 2014 12:10 pm

    And headlights on your truck work good for illuminating the area to find the loop.

  13. HELLFIGHTER July 15th, 2014 4:28 pm

    WE HAVE NOTICED THAT THE WIDTH OF TOOL PASSING OVER THE SENSOR MAKES A DIFFERENCE.HAND TOOLS WOULD NOT ACTIVATE THE GATE(HALIGAN,PIKE POLE,CURB KEY).HOWEVER ROOF LADDER, ALUMINUM SCOOP SHOVEL(APPROX 14″ WIDE) WOULD.THE ATTIC LADDER WOULD ONLY WORK IF WAS OPENED UP.

  14. Mike Deckard August 5th, 2014 11:14 am

    As a retired firefighter and Asst. Chief I believe there is solution to your problem of accessing gated areas. We all know what seconds mean to us. The first AVI System was put in the fire code by the Las Vegas Fire and Rescue in 1991 celebrating it’s 23rd year. The AVI System is a hands free and turn key system that is easily implemented. Mutual Aid is always a concern but all the surrounding departments in Las Vegas implemented the AVI system in their cities and counties.
    We would like to offer your department a demo system FREE of charge. I am willing to personally come and demonstrate the system and help install it into a gated access area.
    Check out the video: http://www.diablocontrols.com/store/avi-100-rd.html
    Please contact me if this offer is of interest to your department.
    Thank you and BE SAFE,
    Mike

  15. Mark Carey January 5th, 2015 4:33 pm

    Just a side note on this. I mentioned this method to a manager at one of our storage unit facilities recently. He was aware of the trick and as you can imagine, a good thief is familiar with the trick too. With that in mind, his setup has an additional keypad inside of the gate which has to be used in order for the gate to operate. So if you see a keypad inside of the fence there is a good chance this trick will not work.

  16. Tom Kennedy July 18th, 2017 9:34 am

    Interesting concept. Definitely something for the tool box. Thank you for the video.

    R,
    Tom Kennedy
    FF/EMT
    OCRFD

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