Archive for November, 2014

Hook & Irons Collaboration

We are very excited to release our newest T-shirt design. This design is a collaboration with Hook and Irons Co.

Hook and Irons Co. is a firefighter owned apparel company devoted to celebrating the traditions and the history of the fire service. Their designs truly reflect all of the beauty and history of our job that result in items that we should all be proud to wear and own. We are truly humbled to have the opportunity to work on this awesome design with them. When talking about the shirt we decided to create a design that was simple and original–a badge for those who believe seconds make a difference.

The VES shirt was hand drawn, then hand painted with water color to create a faded, weathered look that can’t be duplicated using digital processes. The screen print for the shirt was created using that same water color painting. The design is printed on a lightweight tri-blend antique navy shirt.

The shirt is fitted. If you are in between two sizes, order one up.


Sizes



Thank you for your continued support!

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Homemade J-Tool

“Ferg” from Sacramento City (CA) Truck 2 sent in this awesome idea on how to create a simple J-tool for non-destructive forcible entry. It even gets some bonus points for being “green” since it almost counts as recycling or reusing. This idea utilizes the leftover political signs that can be found in every dumpster this time of year. The two most common types of signs have an “H” shape, and a “U” shaped galvanized wire frame. The easiest to use for this purpose are the U shape since it already has one of the required bends, but an H shaped one can also be utilized with some additional work.

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Rather than throwing that “U” shaped one in the trash, tear the sign off, and take that frame over to the workbench. Place the frame in the vice, and begin bending it into shape. Before you commit to the exact size, you may want to consider what will fit in your bunker pant pocket. Use a hacksaw or saws-all to cut the excess material off. You may even want to file the edges down to make it real pro, your gear quartermaster will thank you….

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The completed tool will look like the photo below. For the discussion, we will consider the side with the extra bend the “working end.” This tool is designed for use on a double door with panic hardware. For the traditional panic bar style, you use the working end to “hook” the bar of the locking device. It simply opens by pulling the bar toward you.

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Rotating the tool into place and placing the working end on the locking mechanism can also be used to manipulate the push pad style of panic hardware. Again, once the tool is in place, pulling on the tool will simulate someone pushing the pad from the inside and open the door.

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A wood wedge makes a nice companion for the tool to widen the gap between some doors, or even just to keep the weather striping out of your way. While you’re out hunting for signs, keep the rest of the crew in mind. Make enough for everyone, and throw a few extras on the rig for good measure.

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Like with many other non-destructive methods of forcible entry, this probably won’t be your go-to method on a working fire. However, options like this can simplify your life when chasing down sell-of-smoke type calls, and automatic fire alarm activations. With some practice, you’d be surprised how many different types of locking mechanisms can be manipulated and defeated with this tool. You simply need to take the time to Identify and Visualize what you are trying to defeat, and outsmart the locking mechanism.

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