Archive for November, 2012

Rung Plate

Tillerman Eric Wheaton from Winter Park Truck 61 sent in his “twist” on carrying a hook and ladder. This particular method allows the hook to not only remain in place on the fly section as it is extended, but also allows for the hook to remain in place if the ladder is rolled into a new position along the building. Rolling the ladder like shown in the video is an extremely fast way to move a ladder from one window to another when performing a VES operation.

In this method the hook is simply “hooked” onto the rung plate of the fly section on the inside of the beam. Eric has determined that hooking onto the 3rd rung plate from the tip seems to be the best location to ensure the hook remains in place while rolling the ladder. This method has been tested with a variety of different styles of hooks, and seems to work just as well regardless of hook preference.

Adding a small zip tie to the bottom of the hook may be an option to further secure it to the ladder if so desired. The idea behind the zip tie over a velcro or snapping strap is that a small zip tie will simply break away when the hook is tugged when being placed in operation. Another nice feature about this method of carrying a hook is that depending on the orientation of the ladder compartment on the rig, the hook may be able to remain stored in place all of the time since the hook rides on the inside of the beam against the rungs.

[youtube]http://youtu.be/Y4ato8WnceU[/youtube]

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Free Tiller Webinar

VentEnterSearch’s own Jimm Walsh will be co-presenting a webinar with Lt. Steve Crothers from Seattle Fire titled The Well-Choreographed Tiller Operation on Wednesday November 14, 2012 at 1pm EST. This free webinar is being hosted by FireRescue Magazine and firefighternation.com. Details for signing up for the webinar can be found by clicking here.

Here is a short description of the class:

Tillers are some of the most exciting apparatus to watch, but a smooth, safe, effective tiller operation requires an immense amount of training and coordination. Bringing your firefighters to a high skill level can be a significant challenge. Tractor-drawn aerials are extremely unique pieces of apparatus that requires formal training; the days of “on-the-job training” should be the way of the past. This presentation identifies the principles, concepts and dynamics of driving and tillering a tractor-drawn aerial and will prepare you to overcome the common pitfalls that tractor-drawn aerial operators encounter. You’ll have the opportunity to view unique perspectives that illustrate superior and standard tractor-drawn aerial fundamentals.

You’ll learn:

• Pros and cons of tractor-drawn aerial apparatus
• Key issues for maneuvering tractor-drawn aerial apparatus and how to overcome common placement obstacles such as narrow streets, overhead power lines, hills, etc.
• Common driving mistakes made by tiller operators and tips for improved communication between tiller operator and driver
• Factors to consider when spec’ing a tiller

Now that the webinar has past you can still click here to see the archived version, simply complete the registration information and it will bring you to the archive.

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Check Out Those Cans!

When was the last time you checked your gas cans? Not just the fuel level, but the actual condition of the can? Have you ever taken the time to remove the spark/flame arrestor, and pour all of the fuel out? Check out the photos below to see why this may be a good idea.

These photos show the rust that was poured out of a normal looking metal gas can. The wire mesh that makes up the spark/flame arrestor may actually filter the larger chunks of rust keeping them in the can, but some of the smaller chunks may pass through. This rust could easily make its way into the saw and wreak havoc on a small engine.

There are many benefits to using metal gas cans: durability and compliance with legal requirements are probably the most important. However there is one important potential negative drawback. Rust! It’s just something we may have to deal with since plastic cans are not really an acceptable alternative, and are ultimately not fire service friendly.

The simple fix is to really check the conditions of all of your fuel cans, and have the department spring the $30 to replace that beat up 20 year old gas can and prevent damage from that $1500 saw.

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